Articles

Beyond Marbles

Percent change and social justice

Middle school students analyze a classroom full of social justice issues, armed with their understanding of percent change.

Beyond Marbles

A Librarian in Every School, Books in Every Home

A Modest Proposal

Elementary school students join a campaign to save school librarians.

A Librarian in Every School, Books in Every Home

Shock-Doctrine Schooling in Haiti

Neoliberalism off the Richter scale

Immediately after an earthquake devastated Haiti in 2010, corporations swooped in to capitalize on the destruction and to privatize public enterprises. Hagopian explores how disaster capitalism hit the education system and what the effects were on students and families.

Shock-Doctrine Schooling in Haiti

My First Year as a Teacher of Color

Teaching Against the Grain

A teacher of color writes about obstacles he faced during his first year in the classroom and the support he received — and did not receive — from other teachers and administrators. >>> Interviewing for my first teaching job out of school, I arrived excited in a suit and tie as I was walked to a sunny corner office to meet the principal. A charming middle-aged white woman with a bright smile, a bubbly personality, and contagious excitement, she seemed eager to get to know me and asked to hear my story and find out how this man of Color decided to go into teaching. . . .

My First Year as a Teacher of Color

Crossing Borders, Building Empathy

A 5th-grade teacher uses the short story "First Crossing" to promote empathy for Mexicans entering the United States without documents.

Crossing Borders, Building Empathy

Excerpts from The Line Between Us

After numerous trips to the U.S.-Mexico border, a teacher helps students explore "free trade" and immigration.

Excerpts from The Line Between Us

Tax the Rich, Fight Climate Change

Column: Earth, Justice, and Our Classrooms

The latest installment of our Earth, Justice, and Our Classrooms column looks to a piece of very good news that national media missed following the 2018 midterm elections. By a margin of almost two-to-one, tens of thousands of Portland, Oregon, voters approved an imaginative clean energy initiative that offers a model for the rest of the country — at the ballot box, but also in our classrooms.

Tax the Rich, Fight Climate Change

Deportations on Trial

Mexican Americans During the Great Depression

A social studies teacher describes the role play trial she developed around a largely forgotten period: when during the Great Depression the United States deported thousands of Mexican American families. >>> From the late 1920s to the late 1930s, men, women, and children, immigrant and U.S.-born, citizen and noncitizen, longtime residents and temporary workers all became the targets of a massive campaign of forced relocation, based solely on their perceived status as “Mexican.” They were rounded up in parks, at work sites, and in hospitals; betrayed by local relief agencies who reported anyone with a “Mexican sounding” name to the Immigration Service; tricked and terrorized into “voluntary” deportation by municipal and state officials; and forcibly deported in trains and buses to a country some hadn’t lived in for decades and others never at all. . . .

Deportations on Trial

Who Is Allowed to Teach Spanish in Our Public Schools?

Documenting the Consequences of the edTPA

The director of a world language teacher preparation program argues for an end to the edTPA because it bars native Spanish speakers from public school classrooms. >>> Maria found a position in a local private school, but she is still not eligible to teach in the New York state public school system even though her program’s teacher education faculty, as well as both of her cooperating teachers, were unanimous in deeming Maria qualified to begin her career as a Spanish teacher. . . .

Who Is Allowed to Teach Spanish in Our Public Schools?

You Need Rank and File to Win: How Arizona Teachers Built a Movement

An elementary teacher who helped organize Arizona educators to strike explains how their movement formed and operated, and how it can inspire other teachers’ movements. >>> Across the nation, from Puerto Rico to Kentucky and Colorado to California, a powerful teachers’ movement has been growing. The potential of this movement first became apparent when West Virginia’s teachers went on strike in February and ultimately won a 5 percent raise for all public employees. Following this, Oklahoma’s educators mobilized and won raises and additional funding. After that strike, teachers in my own state of Arizona went on a six-day strike and won $406 million in funding. . . .

You Need Rank and File to Win: How Arizona Teachers Built a Movement

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